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In this paper with Gérard-Varet, Lacave, and Rousset, we prove the inviscid limit of Navier-Stokes flows in domains with a rough or oscillating boundary. Precisely, we study the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes flows with small viscosity {\nu}, posed on the following rough domain:

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Lat week, I gave a graduate student seminar, whose purpose is to introduce to first and second year graduate students (at Penn State) an active and beautiful topics of research, and suggest a few possible ideas for students’ presentation later in the semester. Here are slides of my talk, which focuses on Kinetic Theory of Gases, a topics that I will teach as a graduate topics course, next fall (2017).

In this short paper with C. Bardos, F. Golse, and R. Sentis, we are aimed to justify the Maxwell-Boltzmann approximation from kinetic models, widely used in the literature for electrons density distribution; namely, the relation

\displaystyle n_e =e^{q_{e} \phi / \theta }

in which {n_e, q_e, \theta,\phi} denote the electrons density, the elementary charge, the electron temperature, and the electric potential.

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With Minh-Binh Tran, we establish uniform lower bounds, by a Maxwellian, for positive radial solutions to a Quantum Boltzmann kinetic model for bosons; see arXiv preprint.

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Together with Daniel Han-Kwan, we recently wrote a paper, entitled “Instabilities in the mean field limit”, to be published on the Journal of Statistical Physics (see here for a preprint). I shall explain our main theorem below.

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I go on with some basic concepts and classical results in fluid dynamics [numbering is in accordance with the previous notes]. Throughout this section, I consider compressible barotropic ideal fluids with the pressure law {p = p(\rho)} or incompressible ideal fluids with constant density {\rho = \rho_0} (and hence, the pressure is an unknown function in the incompressible case).

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This Spring ’16 semester, I am teaching a graduate Math 505 course, whose goal is to introduce the basic concepts and the fundamental mathematical problems in Fluid Mechanics for students both in math and engineering. The difficulty is to assume no background in both fluids and analysis of PDEs from the students. That’s it!

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